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New Prosthetic Hand Allows Wearers To Have Real Sensations Of Touch

New Prosthetic Hand Allows Wearers To Have Real Sensations Of Touch

by Stephen BrownNovember 10, 2015

New Prosthetic Hand Allows Wearers To Have Real Sensations Of Touch

One of the challenges with prosthetic limbs is that, without nerves, the wearer cannot  experience dexterity or sense of feeling when touching something. However, research being conducted by the Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and  the  Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies (SSSA) in Italy  may have a solution.

New Prosthetic Hand allows wearers have sensations of touch

Thirty-six-year-old Dennis Aabo Sørensen of Denmark lost his left hand nine years ago while handling fireworks during a family holiday. Dr. Silvestri from the Sant’Anna School and his team chose Sørensen to test the prototype of their new touch enabled hand in February during a clinical trial. According to results published this week, Sorenson was able to feel the pressure (dexterity)  he was applying to several objects including pens, kitchen utensils, and plastic cups.

How it works.

In January, the neurology group from Santa Anna  implanted  trans-neural electrodes in the ulnar and median nerves of Sorenson’s left arm. The neural electrodes channeled weak electrical signals directly into his  nervous system. The electrodes were then connected at the other end to the prosthetic hand, which  measured the tension in the artificial tendons that control the fingers movement. This dexterity data was converted back into an an electrical  impulse the nervous system was able to interpret.

This break through will no doubt usher in a new era of natural feeling, life like  prosthetic’s for injury victims.

Awesome!

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About The Author
Stephen Brown
Stephen Brown @SteveBTech is a Technology Entrepreneur, & Int'l CES Judge. Along with being the founder of DigiLyfe, and Nubby.co, he is the founder of DigitalAfro.com, & StemStars.org an organization that teaches K-12 Students Science & Technology.

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